Jack Russell Terrier Club of America Preserve, Protect and Work the Jack Russell Terrier

Coat Type

Coat type can be divided into three different categories: smooth, broken, and rough. Sometimes it can be extremely difficult to distinguish what category a terrier falls into.

The following definitions have been complied by reviewing the JRTCA breed standard, conversing with conformation judges and members of the breeders committee.

Which Jack Russell Terrier coat type do you prefer?
Choice%Votes
  • Smooth
  •  56.5%21747
  • Broken
  •  22.7%8732
  • Rough
  •  17.2%6620
  • No Preference
  •  3.6%1371

    Total: 38470 votes

    Trace Hair - uncontrollable lengths of hair that does not lay close to the body.

    Smooth Coat

    A coat that does not have trace hair on the head, face, legs or body. A smooth coat does not require any alterations to be ready for the show ring. The coat should not be sparse or soft - it should provide protection from the elements.

    Example of a Smooth Coat

    Broken Coat

    A coat the is very similar to a smooth coat but has trace hair on the head, face, legs or body. A broken coat needs minimal alterations to be ready for the show ring. They will generally only require a quick tidying up. A broken coat should not be soft - it should be harsh to provide protection from the elements.

    Example of a Broken Coat

    Rough Coat

    A coat that has excess trace hair on the head, face, legs or body. The hair is longer than on a smooth or broken coat. A rough coat requires more alterations than a broken coat to be ready for the show ring. A rough coat should not be soft or wooly - it should be harsh to provide protection from the elements.

    Example of a Rough Coat

    Excepts from an article by Lisa Drinkwater and Cheryl Hart (Jul/Aug 99 True Grit)