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Re: Grass Fertilizer

Posted by:  Heather Reid
Posted on:  May 30, 2001 at 15:04:16

In Reply to: Re: Grass Fertilizer
Posted by:  Jane McClay
Posted on:  May 29, 2001 at 23:12:40

Question:

: : : : Now that Summer is pretty much here, I recently started the 4-step program for fertilizing our lawn. I usually try and fertilize before rain is predicted so it won't be on the grass too long, but you know how inaccurate weathermen can be. After I fertilize I always supervise our JRT to make sure she isn't rolling or chewing on anything in the grass & I wipe her paws with a wet towel to get off any residue after she comes back in. Is there any other precautions I should take? Does anyone know how much harm fertilizer can actually cause a JRT?

: : : : Thanks for your help!

: : : : - Brian

: : : ------------------ Response Area -------------------

: : : Hi, Brian,

: : : Okay... time for a confession. Much of my very large yard is a lunar landscape. I don't fertilize, and I have dandilions, crab grass, thistle, even an occasional tiny sapling... basically weeds, weeds and more weeds. I keep the front yard mowed, so it doesn't look so bad... it's actually a very pretty rich green, but the fenced in area where the dogs are kept is treacherous. Holes, holes and more holes. I actually sit on my back steps and watch them dig, and I get a total kick out of it.

: : : Twisted, huh? LOL

: : : I'm the last person to give advice on lawn fertilizer, and I venture to guess that many of the reps here are like me and we are just happy for the green grass we have in certain areas of the yard (mainly the part that the general public might see). I would suggest that the best possible person to give advice on lawn fertilizer would be your veterinarian.

: : : Sorry I can't be of more help, but I'm sure your vet would have the answers you're looking for.

: : : Jane

: : ------------------ Response Area -------------------
: : Hi Brian,
: : I'm with Jane. My dogs are on the Lunar Yardscape Team also. I do not put chemicals on my lawn, period. We keep it mowed and trimmed, and the grass is very lush and healthy. My husband works for a labratory where soil and plants are tested; they have agronomists on staff (my husband's the computer guy) who are knowledgable about fertilizers and such for use in yards with pets. I would suggest finding a agronomy service such as this, perhaps check with Scots Landscaping or TruGreen. They are in most areas. You can also search online for a service that can help you. I wouldn't put anything on my lawn without checking its compatibility with pets first.
: : Heather

: ------------------ Response Area -------------------

: This is a popular post!! I'd like to thank Yvonne and Carol for writing in to share their thoughts! Carol uses organic fertilizer, and suggested you look into that. Yvonne brought up a good point that the next best thing to "grass au naturale" "would be to consult the county agent and go with his recommendation, then water the chemical into the grass, keeping the dog off it until it is dry."

: I'm still really not comfortable with the whole "chemical thing" and am most comfortable with foregoing fertilizer, but I thought I'd forward these suggestions along. I like the sound of what Heather suggests, but I have to admit that I looked up "agronomist" and my faithful Merriam Webster Online didn't give me a definition. LOL

: Jane

------------------ Response Area -------------------
Here's the gist... agronomy is the study of how plants grow in certain types/content of soil. The agronomist is the person who studies the soil and plants, and makes reccomendations of what to put on your lawn or farm field to grow a better yield of a particular crop. The soil and plant testing labs where they work are called agronomic services laboratories. ASLs typically service farmers on a large scale, but turf and garden testing is readily available as well. Turf testing at my husband's place of employment is $8-16.

That's the scoop from Ohio farm country!
Heather